Freeman

February 1996

Volume 46, 1996

FEATURES

How High a Price for Civilization?

Is the Current Level of Taxation in America Really Necessary?

FEBRUARY 01, 1996 by STEPHEN GOLD

Original Intent and the Income Tax

The Income Tax Has Been One of the Biggest Impediments to Entrepreneurship and Growth in America

FEBRUARY 01, 1996 by RAYMOND J. KEATING

Taking Taxes: The Case for Invalidating the Welfare State

Funding Social Welfare Programs with Tax Dollars Violates the Takings Clause

FEBRUARY 01, 1996 by DONALD KOCHAN

Does Big Mean Bad? The Economic Power of Corporations

Market Competition Is More Powerful than Big Corporations Are

FEBRUARY 01, 1996 by DON MATHEWS

Virtual Liberty

The Internet Allows Ordinary Citizens to Subvert Long-Existing Power Structures

FEBRUARY 01, 1996 by MATTHEW R. ESTABROOK

No, Fred, There Is No Free Enterprise--At Least Not Here

North Carolina's Motor Vehicle Dealers and Manufacturers Regulations Code Is Legal Plunder

FEBRUARY 01, 1996 by MARK AHLSEEN

Cultivating Dissent: Wetlands Regulators Down on the Farm

Excessive Regulation Threatens the Brace Family Farm

FEBRUARY 01, 1996 by DAVID PORTER

Is Social Security Pro-Family?

Giving Private Obligations to Government Weakens Family Ties

FEBRUARY 01, 1996 by DANIEL LIN

Increasing Access to Pharmaceuticals

Reforming the FDA Would Reduce Suffering and Early Deaths

FEBRUARY 01, 1996 by DOUG BANDOW

Freedom, Militias, and the Violence Inherent in the System

What Are the Root Causes of Militias?

FEBRUARY 01, 1996 by K. L. BILLINGSLEY
1  2  3 

Download File

EMAIL UPDATES

* indicates required
Sign me up for...

CURRENT ISSUE

July/August 2014

The United States' corporate tax burden is the highest in the world, but innovators will always find a way to duck away from Uncle Sam's reach. Doug Bandow explains how those with the means are renouncing their citizenship in increasing numbers, while J. Dayne Girard describes the innovative use of freeports to shield wealth from the myriad taxes and duties imposed on it as it moves around the world. Of course the politicians brand all of these people unpatriotic, hoping you won't think too hard about the difference between the usual crony-capitalist suspects and the global creative elite that have done so much to improve our lives. In a special tech section, Joseph Diedrich, Thomas Bogle, and Matthew McCaffrey look at various ways these innovators add value to our lives--even in ways they probably never expected.
Download Free PDF

PAST ISSUES

SUBSCRIBE

RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION