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February 1997

Volume 47, 1997

FEATURES

Property Rights and Law Among the Ancient Greeks

The Success of Western Civilization Owes Much to the Greeks

FEBRUARY 01, 1997 by GREGORY REHMKE

Law, Custom, and the Commons

Cultural, Customary, or Informal Arrangements Are Often the Best Way to Protect the Commons

FEBRUARY 01, 1997 by RANDY T. SIMMONS

Property Rights Among Native Americans

Property Rights Encourage the Efficient and Careful Use of Resources

FEBRUARY 01, 1997 by TERRY L. ANDERSON

How Fishing Communities Protect Their Future

We Don't Need Government to Regulate Fishing

FEBRUARY 01, 1997 by DON LEAL

How Property Rights Can Spur Artificial Reefs

Artificial Reefs Enhance the Marine Environment and Benefit Environmentalists and Recreationists

FEBRUARY 01, 1997 by MICHAEL DE ALESSI

An Environment Without Property Rights

Private Property Rights Will Help Undo the Eastern Bloc's Environmental Degradation

FEBRUARY 01, 1997 by RICHARD L. STROUP, JANE S. SHAW

It Takes a Market

The Market Provides Countless Needed and Wanted Goods and Services

FEBRUARY 01, 1997 by BETTINA BIEN GREAVES

The True Takings Reform Imperative

The Power of Eminent Domain Should Be a Power of Last Resort

FEBRUARY 01, 1997 by DONALD KOCHAN

Economic Freedom: Its Measurement and Importance

Free Economies Are More Prosperous

FEBRUARY 01, 1997 by JAMES D. GWARTNEY

Today's War on Property

When Will We Speak Out against Violations of Private Property Rights?

FEBRUARY 01, 1997 by R. W. BRADFORD
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Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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