Freeman

February 1998

Volume 48, 1998

FEATURES

Regulatory Poison

FDA Regulation Is Infinitely More Hazardous to Our Health than Food Irradiation

FEBRUARY 01, 1998 by JAMES BENNETT

Neither Left Nor Right

Libertarians Are Above Authoritarian Degredation

JANUARY 01, 2006 by LEONARD E. READ

The U.S. (Dis)Information Agency

Most People Don't Realize That Promotion of Big Government by Big Government Goes on All the Time

FEBRUARY 01, 1998 by TOM G. PALMER

The Primacy of Property Rights and the American Founding

Private Ownership of Property Provides Real Power and Instills Self-Reliance and Self-Governance

FEBRUARY 01, 1998 by DAVID UPHAM

Property and the Moral Life

Private Property Is the Most Important Guaranty of Freedom

FEBRUARY 01, 1998 by JASON BALDWIN

Campaign Finance: The Symptom, Not the Problem

Wealth Redistribution Should Not Be For Sale

FEBRUARY 01, 1998 by JOHN T. WENDERS

Economic Freedom and Economic Growth

Political Freedom, without Economic Freedom, Does Not Bring Growth

FEBRUARY 01, 1998 by RANDALL G. HOLCOMBE

Regulators: The New Socialists

Kafkaesque Employment Laws Have Created a Workplace Crisis

FEBRUARY 01, 1998 by RALPH R. REILAND

Let Property Settle Smoking Disputes

Smoking Regulations Distort a Proper Understanding of Public versus Private Property

FEBRUARY 01, 1998 by ANDREW COHEN

Government Versus the Environment

Government Causes More Harm to the Environment Than Businesses or Individual Citizens

FEBRUARY 01, 1998 by RUSSELL MADDEN
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