Freeman

February 2000

Volume 50, 2000

FEATURES

Lessons from the Chicago Fire

A Historic Disaster Offers Lessons about Modern Charity

FEBRUARY 01, 2000 by DANIEL OLIVER

Orissa's Man-Made Tragedy

Does Nature Discriminate Against Poorer People and Countries?

FEBRUARY 01, 2000 by BARUN MITRA

Entrepreneurial Discovery and the Law of Supply and Demand

Market Clearing Lies at the Heart of the Law of Supply and Demand

FEBRUARY 01, 2000 by ISRAEL M. KIRZNER

Government as Slave Owner

Portraying All Rights as Dispensations of Government Is a Scam to Convey Absolute Power to Government Officials

FEBRUARY 01, 2000 by JAMES BOVARD

Plunder Gets a Boost

A Secret California Bill Is the Latest Example of the Danger of Economic Ignorance

FEBRUARY 01, 2000 by TIMOTHY SANDEFUR

The Internet: Parental Guidance Preferred

Legislation Is the Wrong Strategy for Protecting Children from Obscene Material Online

FEBRUARY 01, 2000 by KEITH WADE

Why Medicine Is Slowly Dying in America

Most Doctors and Patients Are Clamoring for Increased Rights Without Increased Responsibility

FEBRUARY 01, 2000 by MICHAEL J. HURD

Saving Money by Taking Lives

Caring for Old People Is a Significant Burden on the Public Finances of the Welfare State

FEBRUARY 01, 2000 by MELVYN KRAUSS

A Mad Scramble at 30,000 Feet

Airlines Should Consider Well-Known Solutions to Their Tragedy of the Commons Problem

FEBRUARY 01, 2000 by EDWARD LÓPEZ
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