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January 1968

Volume 18, 1968

FEATURES

Hello

JANUARY 01, 1968 by JOAN WILKE

A successful saleslady explains the advantages of great expectations.

Commitment, Concern, and Apathy

JANUARY 01, 1968 by W. ALLEN WALLIS

On the other hand, suggests Rochester University's President Wallis, so-called apathetic students often are more constructive than those who act thoughtlessly and irresponsibly.

Pseudo Puppeteers

JANUARY 01, 1968 by LEONARD E. READ

Puppeteering with other people's lives is a dangerous game for everyone involved, counsels Leonard Read.

John Quincy Adams: 1767-1848

JANUARY 01, 1968 by ROBERT M. THORNTON

How would John Quincy Adams rate in the political polls were he to stand for office today?

Liberty and Property: One and Inseparable

JANUARY 01, 1968 by WILLIAM HENRY CHAMBERLAIN

William Henry Chamberlin examines the vital link between liberty and property and shows that one is meaningless without the other.

To Be Different - and Free

JANUARY 01, 1968 by BEN MOREELL

Another facet of freedom, explains Admiral Moreell, involves the variety that spices our lives.

Politics is Other People's Money

JANUARY 01, 1968 by OLE-JACOB HOFF

They've discovered in Norway that "politics is other people's money."

The Roots of Democracy

JANUARY 01, 1968 by MILTON H. MATER

When asked by some young Turks to explain the case for democracy, Milton Mater finds the key in local government.

Progress Means Change

JANUARY 01, 1968 by LAWRENCE FERTIG

The equality, stability, security we seek from government, declares Lawrence Fertig, may mean an end to progress.

Demand Deposit Inflation

JANUARY 01, 1968 by ANTHONY REINACH

Anthony Reinach tells why we must expect to be taxed by inflation until we learn to curb deficit spending by governments.

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April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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