Freeman

January 1969

Volume 19, 1969

FEATURES

The Collective Guilt Myth

JANUARY 01, 1969 by WILLIAM HENRY CHAMBERLAIN

Blaming everyone else for the faults and failures of an individual is unlikely to improve the social climate.

The Only Kind of People There Are

JANUARY 01, 1969 by ROGER J. WILLIAMS

Our differences, traits of individuality, are wasted under central planningrequire freedom to develop.

The Rise and Fall of England: 11. The Fabian Thrust to Socialism

JANUARY 01, 1969 by CLARENCE B. CARSON

Concerning the history of the Society and its development since 1884.

The Free Society and Its Enemies

JANUARY 01, 1969 by TIBOR R. MACHAN

One's basic view of human nature determines largely whether he favors freedom or not.

Marx's View of the Division of Labor

JANUARY 01, 1969 by GARY NORTH

An analysis of Marxian errors that have been politically implemented into major disasters in our time.

How We Discourage Investment

JANUARY 01, 1969 by HENRY HAZLITT

The high tax rate on the earnings of successful business ventures is a short-cut to economic stagnation.

Education in America: 4. The Decline of Intellect

JANUARY 01, 1969 by GEORGE CHARLES ROCHE III

How dangerous a little knowledge may be is revealed by those who would reject their intellectual heritage in a new adjustment to circumstances.

In Praise of the Conventional Wisdom

JANUARY 01, 1969 by JACK MCCROSKEY

Our common sense ought to prevail over the utopian promises of socialism.

An Inquiry Concerning Inequality

JANUARY 01, 1969 by W. A. PATON

Variations in nature and in the nature of man point to the blessings of diversity.

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1969/1

JANUARY 01, 1969 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN


"War, Peace, and the Presidency" by Henry Paolucci.


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