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January 1997

Volume 47, 1997

FEATURES

Understanding Say's Law of Markets

Beware measures to boost aggregate demand.

JANUARY 01, 1997 by STEVEN HORWITZ

The Socialist Roots of Modern Anti-Semitism

Socialist Economies Breed Intolerance and Persecution

JANUARY 01, 1997 by TYLER COWEN

Income and the Question of Rights

Do Individuals Have a Moral Claim to the Income They Generate?

JANUARY 01, 1997 by ROY CORDATO

Mises, Hayek, and the Market Process: An Introduction

How Are Market-Based Economies Cultivated and Maintained?

JANUARY 01, 1997 by DAVID PRYCHITKO, NEVENKA CUCKOVIC

Breaking Up Antitrust

Free-Market Competition is the Best Remedy for Monopolies

JANUARY 01, 1997 by EDWARD LÓPEZ

The Economic Woes of Pro Sports: Greed or Government?

Subsidies and Antitrust Regulation Are the True Sources of Exorbitant Salaries and City-Hopping

JANUARY 01, 1997 by RAYMOND J. KEATING

Superstar Athletes Provide Economics Lessons

Where Taxpayer-Funded Welfare Exists, People Will Exploit It

JANUARY 01, 1997 by K. L. BILLINGSLEY

Teen Smoking: The New Prohibition

More Tobacco Regulations Won't Lower Juvenile Smoking

JANUARY 01, 1997 by D. T. ARMENTANO

Government and Governance

Consensual Communities Offer a Model for Tax and Government Reform

JANUARY 01, 1997 by FRED E. FOLDVARY

A Sentinel for Auto Emissions

Remote Sensing Would Eliminate the Hassles of Smog Checks

JANUARY 01, 1997 by DANIEL KLEIN
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Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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