Freeman

January 1997

Volume 47, 1997

FEATURES

Understanding Say's Law of Markets

Beware measures to boost aggregate demand.

JANUARY 01, 1997 by STEVEN HORWITZ

The Socialist Roots of Modern Anti-Semitism

Socialist Economies Breed Intolerance and Persecution

JANUARY 01, 1997 by TYLER COWEN

Income and the Question of Rights

Do Individuals Have a Moral Claim to the Income They Generate?

JANUARY 01, 1997 by ROY CORDATO

Mises, Hayek, and the Market Process: An Introduction

How Are Market-Based Economies Cultivated and Maintained?

JANUARY 01, 1997 by DAVID PRYCHITKO, NEVENKA CUCKOVIC

Breaking Up Antitrust

Free-Market Competition is the Best Remedy for Monopolies

JANUARY 01, 1997 by EDWARD LÓPEZ

The Economic Woes of Pro Sports: Greed or Government?

Subsidies and Antitrust Regulation Are the True Sources of Exorbitant Salaries and City-Hopping

JANUARY 01, 1997 by RAYMOND J. KEATING

Superstar Athletes Provide Economics Lessons

Where Taxpayer-Funded Welfare Exists, People Will Exploit It

JANUARY 01, 1997 by K. L. BILLINGSLEY

Teen Smoking: The New Prohibition

More Tobacco Regulations Won't Lower Juvenile Smoking

JANUARY 01, 1997 by D. T. ARMENTANO

Government and Governance

Consensual Communities Offer a Model for Tax and Government Reform

JANUARY 01, 1997 by FRED E. FOLDVARY

A Sentinel for Auto Emissions

Remote Sensing Would Eliminate the Hassles of Smog Checks

JANUARY 01, 1997 by DANIEL KLEIN
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