Freeman

January/February 2009

Volume 59, 2009

FEATURES

In Praise of Educational Pluralism

Parents Should Have Freedom to Choose Children's Education

JANUARY 20, 2009 by DANNY SHAHAR

Liquid Lies

The Transportation Security Administration is Political, Not Practical

JANUARY 20, 2009 by BECKY AKERS

Raw Milk and the Sour State

Control of the Milk Supply is a Primary Step toward Government Control of the Larger Food Supply

JANUARY 20, 2009 by WILLIAM E. PIKE

Whether it is an expensive organic brand or simply carries a mega-chain store name, that milk has undergone pasteurization and homogenization. There is a growing subset of consumers who would prefer not to buy their milk this way. They want it unpasteurized, unhomogenized—in a word, "raw."

Poker and the Free Market

Good Poker Players Have More in Common with Entrepreneurs than with Gamblers

JANUARY 20, 2009 by ROBERT STEWART

Good poker players are like entrepreneurs: You need greater skill than average to anticipate the future. As Mises so cogently puts it in Human Action, "What distinguishes the successful entrepreneur and promoter from other people is precisely the fact that he does not let himself be guided by what was and is, but arranges his affairs on the ground of his opinion about the future. He sees the past and the present as other people do; but he judges the future in a different way."

Taxation as Vandalism

Taxation is a Crime of the State and the Enemy of Innovation

JANUARY 20, 2009 by LACHLAN MARKAY

Gun Control: An Economic Analysis

Gun Control Will Only Lead Would-Be Killers to Use Substitutes

JANUARY 20, 2009 by SCOTT A. KJAR, JASON ROBINSON

A Man Who Knew the Value of Liberty

Khmer Rouge Survivor Haing Ngor Didn't Take Freedom for Granted

JANUARY 20, 2009 by LAWRENCE W. REED
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