Freeman

July 1972

Volume 22, 1972

FEATURES

Power to the People: the Mask of Despotism

JULY 01, 1972 by CARL KEYSER

How the earliest seeds of socialism sprouted and grew in the United States in the late nineteenth and twentieth century.

Vouchers: Government Control of Private Schools?

JULY 01, 1972 by JOHN P. CAHILL

"It is hardly lack of due process for the government to regulate that which it subsidizes."

Ownership: Free but Not Cheap

JULY 01, 1972 by GARY NORTH

The private owner cannot escape the costs of ownership and the obligation to act as steward of his goods for the public's benefit.

Off the Beaten Track

JULY 01, 1972 by LEONARD E. READ

There is no way to follow the crowd to a new idea or a better way of life.

The Founding of the American Republic: 12. The Scourge of Inflation

JULY 01, 1972 by CLARENCE B. CARSON

The early American attempts at deficit financing were "not worth a Continental."

The Pine Tree Shilling

JULY 01, 1972 by KEVIN CULLINANE

The story of the first private coinage in America.

Zoning Laws: The Case for Repeal

JULY 01, 1972 by DAVID MANDEL

The more scarce and valuable a given resource, the more urgent the need for private ownership and market disposition.

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1972/7

JULY 01, 1972 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN


"Safe Places" by David and Holly Franke

"Freedom and the Law" by Bruno Leoni


Download File

EMAIL UPDATES

* indicates required
Sign me up for...

CURRENT ISSUE

July/August 2014

The United States' corporate tax burden is the highest in the world, but innovators will always find a way to duck away from Uncle Sam's reach. Doug Bandow explains how those with the means are renouncing their citizenship in increasing numbers, while J. Dayne Girard describes the innovative use of freeports to shield wealth from the myriad taxes and duties imposed on it as it moves around the world. Of course the politicians brand all of these people unpatriotic, hoping you won't think too hard about the difference between the usual crony-capitalist suspects and the global creative elite that have done so much to improve our lives. In a special tech section, Joseph Diedrich, Thomas Bogle, and Matthew McCaffrey look at various ways these innovators add value to our lives--even in ways they probably never expected.
Download Free PDF

PAST ISSUES

SUBSCRIBE

RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION