Freeman

July 1974

Volume 24, 1974

FEATURES

You Cannot Trust Governments with Your Money

JULY 01, 1974 by HENRY HAZLITT

The political problem of inflation could be broken by allowing private trading in gold.

Business and Its Image

JULY 01, 1974 by V. ORVAL WATTS

The more government intervenes, the more it strives to blame business enterprise for the consequences.

For the Sake of the Poor

JULY 01, 1974 by PAUL L. POIROT

Poverty serves a purpose, for those who feel pain and react appropriately.

Inflation: Byproduct of Ideologies in Collision

JULY 01, 1974 by WESLEY H. HILLENDAHL

Concerning the monetary crises which come when government forces individuals out of the market.

The Rare Moment

JULY 01, 1974 by LEONARD E. READ

The problem is to see a better idea, and then pursue it with integrity.

There's No Such Thing as a Free Lunch

JULY 01, 1974 by EARL BUTZ

The common sense of producing and marketing farm products by a noted economist.

Yielding to Temptation

JULY 01, 1974 by JOHN C. SPARKS

A letter to a pastor about an evil of universal concern.

No More Repeat Performances

JULY 01, 1974 by BERNARD SIEGAN

The repeal, not the revision, of zoning laws is the way to sound land use.

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1974/7

JULY 01, 1974 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN


"We Don't Know How: An Independent Audit of What They Call Success in Foreign Assistance" by William and Elizabeth Paddock

"Leftism (From De Sade and Marx to Hitler and Marcuse)" by Erik von Kuehnelt-Leddihn


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