Freeman

July 1992

Volume 42, 1992

FEATURES

Strength Springs from Strong Ideas

JULY 01, 1992 by HANS SENNHOLZ

Simple connections between spending and health are tenuous and worthy of better analysis

Corporations at Stake

JULY 01, 1992 by DOUG UYL

Most groups considered to be "stakeholders" have no stake in corporations at all.

The Woman Who Discovered Private Property

JULY 01, 1992 by WILLIAM HOLTZ

Lane encounters primitive communism in a small Albanian village.

Mud Farming and Political Extortion

JULY 01, 1992 by RICHARD B. COFFMAN

Poorly designed property rights can encourage entrepreneurs to undertake wasteful economic activities.

Capitalism: An Olympic Winner

JULY 01, 1992 by DAVID R. HENDERSON

America's apparent failure at the Winter Olympics actually results from one of the country's strengths.

Civil Disobedience: A Threat to Our Society Under Law

JULY 01, 1992 by MORRIS I. LEIBMAN

Liberty under law is a fragile flower.

Czecho-Slovakia Rejoins the West

JULY 01, 1992 by SEAN GABB

Czecho-Slovakia is fast throwing off the disastrous legacy of the last half century.

The Bill of Rights and Moral Philosophy

JULY 01, 1992 by TIBOR R. MACHAN

The Bill of Rights captures basic political and ethical ideals.

The Rifle by the Door

JULY 01, 1992 by DONALD SMITH

Although we don't like to admit it, the spirit of America is the spirit of resistance.

Memories of a Recession Past

JULY 01, 1992 by MALCOLM A. KLINE

Unemployment benefits create perverse incentives.

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