Freeman

July 1996

Volume 46, 1996

FEATURES

Restoring Parental Responsibility for Education

Separation of School and State Would Re-Establish Parents' Rights and Responsibilities

JULY 01, 1996 by MARSHALL FRITZ

How to Separate School and State: A Primer

School Reform Is the Biggest Public Policy Question of the Century

JULY 01, 1996 by DOUGLAS DEWEY

The Spread of Education Before Compulsion: Britain and America in the Nineteenth Century

Government Education Increased Bureaucracy and Reduced Liberty

JULY 01, 1996 by EDWIN WEST

Education: What About the Poor?

Government Education Harms Low-Income Children Most Severely

JULY 01, 1996 by CHRIS CARDIFF

Teachers Unions: Are the Schools Run for Them?

No Simple Reform Will Break the Power of Teachers' Unions

JULY 01, 1996 by JAMES BOVARD

Government Licensing: The Enemy of Employment

How Come Many People Who Want to Work Can't Find Jobs?

JULY 01, 1996 by STEVEN YATES

When Entrepreneurs Become Victims

Why Did the FTC Pursue the Publisher of Hooked on Phonics?

JULY 01, 1996 by PATRICK GROFF

Liberty and Responsibility: Inseparable Ideals

Liberty Is Vulnerable to Decay into Mere License

JULY 01, 1996 by MAX MORE

Rejecting Responsibility

The Actions of Well-Intentioned Do-Gooders Continue to Plague Us

JULY 01, 1996 by RUSSELL MADDEN

The Virtues of Competition

Competition Encourages Better Performance

JULY 01, 1996 by GEORGE C. LEEF
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