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July 1998

Volume 48, 1998

FEATURES

For the Children

The Boundaries of Child-Centered Concern Have Expanded to Include Government Action

JULY 01, 1998 by RUSSELL MADDEN

The Heritage We Owe Our Children

Our Founding Fathers Declared Their Independence from Despotism

JULY 01, 1998 by LEONARD E. READ

Character and Government Policy

How Can Government Policies That Create Disasters Be Called "Benefits"?

JULY 01, 1998 by DALE WALSH

Educational Decarceration

Public Education Is Based on the Prison Concept

JULY 01, 1998 by DANIEL HAGER

Guess Who Paved the Road to Socialized Medicine?

Republicans Helped Create the Largest Health-Care Entitlement in 30 Years

JULY 01, 1998 by SUE A. BLEVINS

Let's Not Throw American Medicine into Boston Harbor

Both the Type of Insurance and the Payment Mechanism Are at Fault in American Health Care

JULY 01, 1998 by JANE M. ORIENT M.D.

Climate-Change Worries in the Eighteenth Century

Members of England's Lunar Society Feared Global Cooling

JULY 01, 1998 by AUBREY DREWRY

Should There Be a Carbon Subsidy?

Increased Carbon Dioxide May Be Generating Social Benefits

JULY 01, 1998 by ROY CORDATO

The Taiwan Model

What Conditions Have Led Taiwan to Succeed Against All Odds?

JULY 01, 1998 by HUGH MACAULAY

The Wild West Meets Cyberspace

Government Intervention Will Stifle the Internet's Freedom

JULY 01, 1998 by ANDREW P. MORRISS
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April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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