Freeman

July/August 2003

Volume 53, 2003

FEATURES

The Scapegoat Utility Vehicle

What's So Threatening about SUVs?

JULY 01, 2003 by SAM KAZMAN

Chemical Hysteria and Environmental Politics

Alarmist Groups with Radical Political Agendas Manipulate Science

JULY 01, 2003 by DOUG BANDOW

Washington's Centrally Planned Heating and Cooling

Why Does Government Outlaw Consumers' Preferred Products?

JULY 01, 2003 by MICHAEL HEBERLING

Clarence B. Carson, R.I.P.

Carson Lived a Life Full of Significance

JULY 01, 2003 by PAUL A. CLEVELAND

A Carson Sampler

In Honor of a Long-Time FEE Contributing Editor

JULY 01, 2003

Planned Chaos: Industrial Waste Recycling in Communist Economies

Central Planning Creates Chaos and Economic Regression

JULY 01, 2003 by PIERRE DESROCHERS

Law and Property: The Best Hope for Liberty?

There Remains Little Protection for Individualism

JULY 01, 2003 by NORMAN BARRY

There is little left of the conventional protections for individualism in the modern world. Whatever theoretical virtues there may be in democracy (and there aren't many1), in practice it has disintegrated into a struggle among self-regarding interest groups, mediated by government, over wealth that is exclusively created by private individuals.

Yes or No to the Euro?

Exploring the Real Motives Behind Expanding the Euro's Use

JULY 01, 2003 by KARL SIGFRID

The Economics of Smoking Bans

Restaurant and Bar Owners Should Have the Freedom to Determine Smoking Policies

JULY 01, 2003 by ARTHUR FOULKES

Lessons from the First Airplane

Are Subsidies Needed to Spur New Inventions?

JULY 01, 2003 by LAWRENCE W. REED
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The United States' corporate tax burden is the highest in the world, but innovators will always find a way to duck away from Uncle Sam's reach. Doug Bandow explains how those with the means are renouncing their citizenship in increasing numbers, while J. Dayne Girard describes the innovative use of freeports to shield wealth from the myriad taxes and duties imposed on it as it moves around the world. Of course the politicians brand all of these people unpatriotic, hoping you won't think too hard about the difference between the usual crony-capitalist suspects and the global creative elite that have done so much to improve our lives. In a special tech section, Joseph Diedrich, Thomas Bogle, and Matthew McCaffrey look at various ways these innovators add value to our lives--even in ways they probably never expected.
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