Freeman

July/August 2004

Volume 54, 2004

FEATURES

The WHO Global Treaty on Tobacco: A Smokescreen for More Government Control

Free Markets Harmonize Our Diverse Ideals and Desires

JULY 01, 2004 by RICHARD EBELING

Whose Airwaves Are They?

There Is Nothing Peculiar About the Broadcast Spectrum to Justify Collectivization

JULY 01, 2004 by SHELDON RICHMAN

The Lasting Legacy of the Reagan Revolution

Reagan Was Not Fooled by Emotional and Illogical Rationales for Government Regulation

JULY 01, 2004 by RICHARD EBELING

The Most Insidious Tax

Inflation Is a Subtle Second Tax

JULY 01, 2004 by DALE M. HAYWOOD

Borders and Liberty

Borders Create Jurisdictional Competition and Allow Diversity in Law and Community Norms

JULY 01, 2004 by ANDREW P. MORRISS

The Big We Really Need to Beware

We Can't Fault Free Enterprise for Violations by Big Government

JULY 01, 2004 by WAYNE DUNN

House of Aces

Mental Illness Is Considered a Real and Treatable Disease in the Age of Biological Psychiatry

JULY 01, 2004 by THOMAS S. SZASZ

To Understand Change, Learn History

Today's Economic Challenges Are Really Political

JULY 06, 2010 by JOHN HOOD

A Busybody Behind Every Tree

Regulation Isn't Why Trees Thrive in Takoma Park

JULY 07, 2010 by JAMES L. PAYNE

Herbert Spencer: Libertarian Prophet

Textbook Summaries of Spencer Are Absurd

JULY 07, 2010 by RODERICK T. LONG
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