Freeman

July/August 2005

Volume 55, 2005

FEATURES

No Buts about Freedom

No Compromise Is Possible Between Freedom and Coercion

JULY 01, 2005 by RICHARD EBELING

When everyone's exceptions to freedom are added up, well, freedom ends up being sunk by all the "buts."

Pharmacists and Freedom

Individual Freedom and Private Property Are Indispensable for Resolving Disputes

JULY 01, 2005 by SHELDON RICHMAN

The Persistent Influence of Bad Ideas

How J. A. Hobson's Ideas about Imperialism Became Common Wisdom

JULY 01, 2005 by STEPHEN DAVIES

Vorkuta to Perm: Russia's Concentration-Camp Museums and My Father's Story

Teaching Future Generations about Government Terror and Enslavement in the Soviet Union

JULY 01, 2005 by JON BASIL UTLEY

Postal Monopoly: Playing by Different Rules

Government Monopolies Don't Face Competition

JULY 01, 2005 by ROBERT CARREIRA

Choice Is Too Burdensome?

A Coercive Pyramid Scheme Can't Be Morally Preferable

JULY 01, 2005 by AEON SKOBLE

Idiots, Infants and the Insane: Mental Illness and Legal Incompetence

Psychiatrists Never Know if a Patient Is Competent

JULY 01, 2005 by THOMAS S. SZASZ

Who Hates Wal-Mart and Why?

Competitors Turn to Politicians to Hamstring Wal-Mart

JULY 01, 2005 by RUSSELL ROBERTS

Why Freedom Matters

Liberty Leads to Prosperity

JULY 01, 2005 by JAMES A. DORN
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