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June 1969

Volume 19, 1969

FEATURES

A Capitalist Manifesto

JUNE 01, 1969 by WILLIAM HENRY CHAMBERLAIN

The proven superiority of capitalism in solving the problems envisioned by Marx should bring forth a new manifesto.

Combinations in Restraint of Trade

JUNE 01, 1969 by PAUL L. POIROT

In our zeal to reform the world, we often embrace one of the very errors we most abhor.

The Rise and Fall of England: 16. The Fall of England (Part I)

JUNE 01, 1969 by CLARENCE B. CARSON

The anomaly of the collapse under socialism of a victor nation in World War II.

The Intellect in Utopia

JUNE 01, 1969 by ROGER DONWAY

How the mind of the reformer and his freedom to plan must give way to the coercive methods he espouses.

The Right to Health

JUNE 01, 1969 by THOMAS S. SZASZ

If one has a right to treatment, does he have a right to resist treatment? And who is to provide such care?

Education in America: 9. Academic Freedom for What?

JUNE 01, 1969 by GEORGE CHARLES ROCHE III

Freedom to seek the truth within the bounds of civilized society and to attract students toward such findings.

The Fallacy of "Intrinsic Value"

JUNE 01, 1969 by GARY NORTH

Not the labor stored in gold but its physical properties cause man to value it as money.

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1969/6

JUNE 01, 1969 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN


"The Coming Aristocracy" by Leonard E. Read

"Dollars and Deficits" and

"The Optimum Quantity of Money, and other Essays" both by Milton Friedman

"So Human an Animal" by Rene Dubos


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April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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