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June 1972

Volume 22, 1972

FEATURES

When Men Appeal from Tyranny to God

JUNE 01, 1972 by EDWARD P. COLESON

A bicentennial for the men behind the freeing of slaves in England.

Pollution and Property

JUNE 01, 1972 by OSCAR W. COOLEY

Not the socialists but the capitalists have the solution to pollution.

The Founding of the American Republic: 11. The War for Independence

JUNE 01, 1972 by CLARENCE B. CARSON

Concerning the distinction between declaring for independence and achieving it in practice.

The Cure for Poverty

JUNE 01, 1972 by HENRY HAZLITT

Those who truly wish to help the poor will save and invest to create more and better-paying jobs.

Business Baiting - 1972 Style

JUNE 01, 1972 by MERRYLE STANLEY RUKEYSER

A plea for an attempt to understand the nature and function of business before destroying the entire economy.

Blood from Turnips

JUNE 01, 1972 by TERRILL I. ELNIFF

Notes toward an understanding of John Law's economic errors.

The Educational Dilemma

JUNE 01, 1972 by DONALD DOZER

Identifying the lines of authority and responsibility in educational affairs.

"I Was a Slumlord..."

JUNE 01, 1972 by GEORGE FRANK

An East Harlem owner buys his freedom from rent controls.

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1972/6

JUNE 01, 1972 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN


"Welfare: Hidden Backlash" by Morris C. Shumiatcher

"Joseph Story and the American Constitution" by James McClellan


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April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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