Freeman

June 1979

Volume 29, 1979

FEATURES

A Strategy for the War of Ideas

JUNE 01, 1979 by SYLVESTER PETRO

Why scholarly books are the best ammunition in the struggle for the truth about freedom.

Inflation Fighters Bark Up The Wrong Tree

JUNE 01, 1979 by OSCAR W. COOLEY

The point, again, is that inflation is strictly the result of monetary manipulation.

Nutrition Planning

JUNE 01, 1979 by E.C. PASOUR

Critical shortcomings seen in proposed governmental food policy.

Amazing Strange

JUNE 01, 1979 by JESS RALEY

The remarkable consequences of the removal of milk from price control.

Around the World . . .

JUNE 01, 1979 by PERRY E. GRESHAM

This distinguished scholar shares some impressions gained during an 80-day cruise on the QE2.

World in the Grip of an Idea: 30. The Individual: Victim of the Idea

JUNE 01, 1979 by CLARENCE B. CARSON

The tendency of organizations is toward a governing force that reduces the independence of the individual.

Excess Losses

JUNE 01, 1979 by J. BROOKS COLBURN

In terms of consumer satisfaction, resources are better used to generate profit than to show a loss.

The Nature of Work

JUNE 01, 1979 by ROBERT LEFEVRE

Let the parent help the child adopt and follow goal-oriented procedures of a constructive nature.

Input Slavery and Output Slavery

JUNE 01, 1979 by IRA GOTTLIEB

In open competition, neither employees nor employers are exploited.

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1979/6

JUNE 01, 1979 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN


"The Right and Wrong of Compulsion by the State, and Other Essays" by Auberon Herbert.


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