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June 1998

Volume 48, 1998

FEATURES

In Memoriam: Yale Brozen

An Honorable Scholar of Industrial Organization and Antitrust

JUNE 01, 1998 by DAVID R. HENDERSON

The Attack on Concentration

JANUARY 01, 1979 by YALE BROZEN

Firms that efficiently win a large share of the market face FTC and antitrust prosecutionto the detriment of consumers.

The Ghost of John D. Rockefeller

Antitrust Regulation Allows Politicians to Pose as Populists

JUNE 01, 1998 by THOMAS J. DILORENZO

Economics: A Branch of Moral Philosophy

JANUARY 01, 1972 by LEONARD E. READ

Right and wrong ways to cope with the problem of scarcity.

Natural Society Revisited

A Happy Community Cannot Be Created by Force

JUNE 01, 1998 by JULIANA GERAN PILON

The Origin of Religious Tolerance

Freedom of Commerce Is the True Wellspring of Religious Toleration

JUNE 01, 1998 by WENDY MCELROY

A Peaceful Ferment in Somalia

Can a Stateless Society Thrive in the Modern World?

JUNE 01, 1998 by SPENCER HEATH MACCALLUM

Statistics: A Vehicle for Collectivist Mischief

Statistics Suggest Artificial Problems That Fuel Interventionism

JUNE 01, 1998 by JOHN T. WENDERS

Should Government Build the Railroads?

How Michigan's Foray into Public Transportation Networks Caused an Economic Collapse in the State

JUNE 01, 1998 by BURTON FOLSOM

Great Turnabouts in Economics, Part II

Blaug's Conversion Toward Free-Market Capitalism Is on the Right Track

JUNE 01, 1998 by MARK SKOUSEN
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Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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