Freeman

June 2000

Volume 50, 2000

FEATURES

Another Reason for Airport Privatization

Government Ownership of U.S. Airports Thwarts Airline Competition

JUNE 01, 2000 by ROBERT W. POOLE JR.

Merger Policy Fails Hi-Tech Test

Competition Is Not a Static, Zero-Sum Battle

JUNE 01, 2000 by HENRY DEMMERT

Constitutional Intentions

The Intentions Behind the Constitution Varied Widely

JUNE 01, 2000 by WENDY MCELROY

The War Against Drug-Speech

Washington Hopes to Muzzle a Public Critical of the Failing War on Drugs

JUNE 01, 2000 by PAUL ARMENTANO

Trade and the Rise of Freedom

Restrictions on Trade Are Nothing Less Than an Act of Theft

JUNE 01, 2000 by THOMAS J. DILORENZO

War

Plunder by Way of War Is Rooted in Man's Nature

JUNE 01, 2000 by FREDERIC BASTIAT

Economic Insecurity: Are We the Enemy?

Legislating Against Self-Interest Can Have Disastrous Results

JUNE 01, 2000 by CHRISTOPHER LINGLE

The Evolution of Capitalism

Why Did Europe Develop a System of Market Capitalism?

JUNE 01, 2000 by JAMES PERON

A few centuries ago things looked pretty hopeless for Europe, at least according to "common wisdom" now accepted in political circles. The region was splintered among hundreds of local principalities with no unifying government, no common currency, and no common language. If today's typical political scientist had had to guess where a system of market capitalism would have arisen, it is doubtful he would have considered Europe a likely candidate.

Punishing the Many

Most Regulations Make the Accused Prove His Innocence

JUNE 01, 2000 by RUSSELL MADDEN

The Golden Rule and the Free Market

The Golden Rule Runs up Against a Cultural Wall When It Comes to Business

JUNE 01, 2000 by WILLIAM H. PETERSON
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