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June 2004

Volume 54, 2004

FEATURES

1914 and the World We Lost

World War I Ended the Classical Liberal Epoch

JUNE 01, 2004 by RICHARD EBELING

Nock Revisited

On Doing the Right Thing

JUNE 01, 2012 by SHELDON RICHMAN

"The practical reason for freedom, then, is that freedom seems to be the only condition under which any kind of substantial moral fibre can be developed."

Choice Is Bad for Us?

Barry Schwartz Thinks Americans Have Too Many Options

JUNE 01, 2004 by JAMES R. OTTESON

Austrian Economics and the Political Economy of Freedom

The Austrian School Has Advanced the Cause of Freedom

JUNE 01, 2004 by RICHARD EBELING

Buying Foreign Goods Saves American Jobs

Consumer-Led Protectionism Is Born of Economic Illiteracy

JUNE 01, 2004 by ROBERT CARREIRA

Mises on Copyrights

New Technology Requires Refinement of Private Property Rights

JUNE 01, 2004 by BETTINA BIEN GREAVES

Bermuda, Freedom, and Economic Growth

Bermuda Assists Ordinary People by Limiting Government Power

JUNE 01, 2004 by ROBERT STEWART

The Progressive Era’s Derailment of Classical-Liberal Evolution

We Must Repair Our Country's Impoverished Institutional Framework

JUNE 01, 2004 by FRED SMITH

Antiglobalists Are Scarce in Poor Countries

Affluent Protesters Miss the Mark

JUNE 01, 2004 by JAMES PERON
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April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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