Freeman

March 1995

Volume 45, 1995

FEATURES

Risks in the Modern World: What Prospects for Rationality?

Political Risk Management Is Irrational

MARCH 01, 1995 by FRED SMITH

Chemicals and Witches: Standards of Evidence in Regulation

Arousing Public Fear Is an Ancient Bureaucratic Strategy

MARCH 01, 1995 by ROBERT H. NELSON

Controlling Risk: Regulation or Rights?

Misreading Risk Results in Misdirected Solutions

MARCH 01, 1995 by RICHARD L. STROUP

Prosperity, or rising levels of wealth and income, are a key to environmental improvement.

EcoKids: New Automatons on the Block

Environmental "Education" Is Brainwashing Our Children

MARCH 01, 1995 by JO KWONG

The Role of Rights

Common Law Promotes Responsible Behavior

MARCH 01, 1995 by ROGER E. MEINERS

The War on Radon: Few Join Up

Why Does the EPA Go After Radon?

MARCH 01, 1995 by KENT JEFFREYS

Making the Polluter Pay

Common Law Remedies Provide Better Solutions to Environmental Pollution

MARCH 01, 1995 by JONATHAN H. ADLER

Why Governments Can't Handle Risk

Safety Is a Process of Discovery

MARCH 01, 1995 by RANDY T. SIMMONS

Human Health and Costly Risk Reduction

The Federal Government's Risk-Reduction Efforts Are Badly Skewed

MARCH 01, 1995 by BRUCE YANDLE

Assessing the Risk Assessors

Can We Rely on the Findings of Government Experts?

MARCH 01, 1995 by DANIEL BENJAMIN
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