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March 1995

Volume 45, 1995

FEATURES

Risks in the Modern World: What Prospects for Rationality?

Political Risk Management Is Irrational

MARCH 01, 1995 by FRED SMITH

Chemicals and Witches: Standards of Evidence in Regulation

Arousing Public Fear Is an Ancient Bureaucratic Strategy

MARCH 01, 1995 by ROBERT H. NELSON

Controlling Risk: Regulation or Rights?

Misreading Risk Results in Misdirected Solutions

MARCH 01, 1995 by RICHARD L. STROUP

Prosperity, or rising levels of wealth and income, are a key to environmental improvement.

EcoKids: New Automatons on the Block

Environmental "Education" Is Brainwashing Our Children

MARCH 01, 1995 by JO KWONG

The Role of Rights

Common Law Promotes Responsible Behavior

MARCH 01, 1995 by ROGER E. MEINERS

The War on Radon: Few Join Up

Why Does the EPA Go After Radon?

MARCH 01, 1995 by KENT JEFFREYS

Making the Polluter Pay

Common Law Remedies Provide Better Solutions to Environmental Pollution

MARCH 01, 1995 by JONATHAN H. ADLER

Why Governments Can't Handle Risk

Safety Is a Process of Discovery

MARCH 01, 1995 by RANDY T. SIMMONS

Human Health and Costly Risk Reduction

The Federal Government's Risk-Reduction Efforts Are Badly Skewed

MARCH 01, 1995 by BRUCE YANDLE

Assessing the Risk Assessors

Can We Rely on the Findings of Government Experts?

MARCH 01, 1995 by DANIEL BENJAMIN
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April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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