Freeman

March 1996

Volume 46, 1996

FEATURES

The America We Lost

MAY 01, 1964 by MARIO A. PEI

Pardon the repetition, but it is important to look back now and then at ideals we may be losing.

Fallacies of Uncritical Multiculturalism

Different Cultures May Exhibit Various Degrees of Evil

MARCH 01, 1996 by TIBOR R. MACHAN

America's Other Democracy

Every Day Is Election Day in the Marketplace

MARCH 01, 1996 by WILLIAM H. PETERSON

Inequality of Wealth and Incomes

America's Taxation Policy Is Leading the Country Toward Socialism

MARCH 01, 1996 by LUDWIG VON MISES

Competition and Cooperation

Two sides of the same coin.

JUNE 10, 2010 by STEVEN HORWITZ

Competition and cooperation are often juxtaposed, yet in the market they are two sides of the same activity.

From Each According to His Abilities . . .

Socialism Eventually Results in a Living Death

MARCH 01, 1996 by THOMAS J. SHELLY

Legalized Immorality

Government Allows Individuals to Escape Moral Responsibility

MARCH 01, 1996 by CLARENCE MANION

Nullifying the Rule of Law

Jurors Ignoring the Law Accomplish Nothing but Anarchy in Microcosm

MARCH 01, 1996 by MARK S. PULLIAM

Why It Matters

Governments Place Restrictions and Barriers on Economic Activity

MARCH 01, 1996 by ROGER M. CLITES
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