Freeman

March 2000

Volume 50, 2000

FEATURES

150 Years and Still Dismal!

Thomas Carlyle's Problem with Economics Was its Opposition to Racial Slavery

MARCH 01, 2000 by DAVID LEVY

The Irresistible Force of Market Competition

Austrian Economists Have a Different Understanding of Market Competition

MARCH 01, 2000 by ISRAEL M. KIRZNER

The Myth of the Social Security Trust Fund

The Looted Trust Fund Myth Is a Serious Barrier to Social Security Reform

MARCH 01, 2000 by JOHN ATTARIAN

In Defense of Grocery Coupons

The Invisible Hand Works

MARCH 01, 2000 by BILL FIELD

The Market for Space in the Market

Shelf Fees Efficiently Allocate Risk to Producers

MARCH 01, 2000 by GARY M. GALLES

Spam, Spam, Spam, and Spam

Spam Is No Justification for New Regulations

MARCH 01, 2000 by GARY MCGATH

The Stakeholder Fallacy

Stakeholderism Undermines the Defining Feature of Capitalism: The Exclusive Rights of Ownership

MARCH 01, 2000 by NORMAN BARRY

Regulatory Extortion

No Company or Industry Is Safe

MARCH 01, 2000 by THOMAS J. DILORENZO

Sources of Pro-Union Sentimentality

Labor Unions Are Really Cartels Backed by Legal Compulsion

MARCH 01, 2000 by CHARLES W. BAIRD

The Day We Read No More

The Perils of a Maryland Courtroom Reading Ban

MARCH 01, 2000 by ANGUS CRANE
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