Freeman

March 2002

Volume 52, 2002

FEATURES

Why Children Are Dying in the Nation's Capital

D.C.'s Child and Family Services Agency Is Shockingly Incompetent

MARCH 01, 2002 by JAMES L. PAYNE

A New Old American Concept of Political Liberty

True Freedom Is Found in the Competition for Laws and Institutions

MARCH 01, 2002 by NORMAN BARRY

Nullification: The Jeffersonian Brake on Government

A Government Cannot Determine the Scope of Its Own Powers

MARCH 01, 2002 by THOMAS E. WOODS JR.

On Guests and Customers

What Terms Best Define Voluntary Exchange?

MARCH 01, 2002 by STEPHEN G. BARONE

The Virtues of Sweatshops

The Law of Comparative Advantage Guides the Production of Goods

MARCH 01, 2002 by STEFAN SPATH

America's Worst Enemy

Without Individual Responsibility, Governments Run Wild

MARCH 01, 2002 by GEORGE SMITH

Prescription Drugs and Advertising

Consumer Demand Determines Value

MARCH 01, 2002 by WILLIAM L. ANDERSON

Protecting Precious Resources

The Profit Motive Makes Natural Resources Secure

MARCH 01, 2002 by SCOTT MCPHERSON

Do Big Corporations Control America?

Arguments Against Corporate Dominance

MARCH 01, 2002 by JAMES ROLPH EDWARDS

Beijing Erodes Hong Kong's Laissez Faire

China's Political System Must Be Modernized

MARCH 01, 2002 by CHRISTOPHER LINGLE
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