Freeman

March 2005

Volume 55, 2005

FEATURES

Bad Is Not Good

How Does an Interventionist Culture Reform Itself?

MARCH 01, 2005 by SHELDON RICHMAN

Detroit's Flirtation with Economic Suicide

Local Politicians Endorse a Racist, Government-Focused Approach to Economic Development

MARCH 01, 2005 by LAWRENCE W. REED

The European Union and the Interventionist State

A European Constitution Will Centralize All Decision-Making

MARCH 01, 2005 by RICHARD EBELING

The Great Outsourcing Scare of 2004

Part Sensationalism, Part Economic Ignorance

MARCH 01, 2005 by JUDE BLANCHETTE

Free Trade and the Climb Out of Poverty

Lifting Trade Restrictions Improves Economic Development

MARCH 01, 2005 by STEVEN HORWITZ

Ludwig von Mises and The Vienna of His Time (Part 1)

Liberalism and Socialism Transformed Austrian Jewish Society

MARCH 01, 2005 by RICHARD EBELING

Capitalism: Still on Trial

Market Mechanisms Remain the Best Protection Against Corporate Fraud

MARCH 01, 2005 by NORMAN BARRY

Unjust Compensation

Victims of Eminent Domain Face Undue Stress and Financial Loss

MARCH 01, 2005 by STEVEN GREENHUT

Hypnotized by Models

Economists Fail to Interpret the Application of Mathematical Models to Real-Life Events

MARCH 01, 2005 by ROBERT P. MURPHY, GENE CALLAHAN

How the Western Cattlemen Created Property Rights

Early Pioneers Carved Out Stable Private Institutions

MARCH 01, 2005 by ROBERT HIGGS
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