Freeman

May 1968

Volume 18, 1968

FEATURES

Freedom: "The Wave of the Future"?

MAY 01, 1968 by EDWARD P. COLESON

The history of great movements, from the planting of an idea until its flowering as a major force among men, suggests that around the next corner may be the age of freedom.

The Price Is Not Right

MAY 01, 1968 by JESS RALEY

Something for nothing invariably costs too much.

Statistics and Poverty

MAY 01, 1968 by HARRY L. SMITH

There is no statistical or governmental way to eliminate a "lower third" from any society, but their lot can be vastly improved through freedom.

How Welfarism Has Led to Britain's Troubles

MAY 01, 1968 by ANTHONY LEJEUNE

A friend from Britain advises Americans to reject the welfare state before suffering its inevitable consequences.

The Rise and Fall of England: 3. Political Foundations of Liberty

MAY 01, 1968 by CLARENCE B. CARSON

A review of political steps taken to establish and safeguard the rights of the individual and limit the powers of government.

Making Travel a Crime

MAY 01, 1968 by WILLIAM HENRY CHAMBERLAIN

A government that can deny a peaceful citizen's freedom to move is well along toward absolute tyranny.

A Sure-Fire Remedy

MAY 01, 1968 by LEONARD E. READ

To overcome one's socialistic urge requires only that he take his own medicine to its logical conclusion.

A Lesson in Time

MAY 01, 1968 by JOHN O. NELSON

The United States government literally didn't know what time it was until private enterprise fixed the clock.

Equality?

MAY 01, 1968 by EDWARD Y. BREESE

Equal opportunities to different persons yield unequal results.

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1968/5

MAY 01, 1968 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN


"The World of Andrew Carnegie" by Louis M. Hacker

"The Balance of Payments: Free vs. Fixed Exchange Rates" by Milton Friedman and Robert V. Roosa

"The Last Hero: Charles A. Lindbergh" by Walter S. Ross


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