Freeman

May 1973

Volume 23, 1973

FEATURES

The European Communities and the Free Economy

MAY 01, 1973 by J. ENOCH POWELL

Calling something an economic community does not alter the political nature of the arrangement.

Freedom Is an Uninsurable Risk

MAY 01, 1973 by PAUL L. POIROT

The results of freedom cannot be classified or known in advance.

Stubborn Facts and Hard Heads

MAY 01, 1973 by EDMUND OPITZ

The sooner we recognize that there are unchanging rules of life, the easier for us to enter into it.

The Passing Parade

MAY 01, 1973 by ROBERT W. DEMERS

How to find in commonplace things the miracle of the market.

Evolution and Liberty

MAY 01, 1973 by RONALD F. COONEY

A search for the "fittest" among the ideas of the Social Darwinists.

Bretton Woods: 1944-1971

MAY 01, 1973 by PAUL STEVENS

Bretton Woods is dead and an autopsy is called for to determine the cause of death.

Seeds of Oppression

MAY 01, 1973 by ROBERT E. HOOD

How government welfare programs inevitably lead to abuse and oppression.

Something Else

MAY 01, 1973 by FREDERIC BASTIAT

When it comes to protectionism, are we better able than Robinson Crusoe to see its fallacy?

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1973/5

MAY 01, 1973 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN


"How to Start Your Own School" by Robert D. Love

"What You Can Do About Inflation, Unemployment, Productivity, Profits, and Collective Bargaining" by Lemuel R. Boulware


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