Freeman

May 1974

Volume 24, 1974

FEATURES

Living with Shortages

MAY 01, 1974 by DICK SABROFF

An engineer sees no reason why we should try to live with shortages.

FEO and the Gas Lines

MAY 01, 1974 by MILTON FRIEDMAN

If we wait for Uncle Sam to provide, the lines will be interminable.

Price, the Peaceful Regulator

MAY 01, 1974 by C.W. ANDERSON

When parties are not permitted to trade at the price agreeable to both, violence will erupt.

Made in Washington

MAY 01, 1974 by PAUL L. POIROT

Washington can lead us into crisis, if we so empower the government.

The Puritan Experiment with Price Controls

MAY 01, 1974 by GARY NORTH

Concerning the search in early New England for a "just price."

Windfall Profits

MAY 01, 1974 by ROBERT G. ANDERSON

Erratic changes in consumer evaluations create profit opportunities for alert entrepreneurs.

The Role of Savings

MAY 01, 1974 by BRIAN SUMMERS

Savings are discouraged by government intervention.

The Blessings of Diversity

MAY 01, 1974 by LEONARD E. READ

Were all alike, instead of free, t'would mean the end of me and thee.

Competition: Key to Consumer Dominance

MAY 01, 1974 by BERNARD SIEGAN

The entrepreneur renders society valuable services without cost.

In Quest of Justice

MAY 01, 1974 by RIDGWAY K. FOLEY JR.

Man's nature and justice in inter-human relationships.

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