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May 1999

Volume 49, 1999

FEATURES

A Modern Pyramid

Should Tax Dollars Be Spent to Build a Space Station?

MAY 01, 1999 by CHRISTOPHER MAYER

Must I Not Be Believed?

We Are Left with a President Crippled by His Own Dishonesty

MAY 01, 1999 by E. CALVIN BEISNER

Bogus Freedom

Freedom from Want Is Not Possible

MAY 01, 1999 by JAMES BOVARD

The Green Scare

Grossly Distorted Stories Serve Interventionist Environmentalism

MAY 01, 1999 by ROGER E. MEINERS

Fighting Back

Friends of Liberty Should Write More Letters to the Editor

MAY 01, 1999 by JOHN LANDRUM

Friedrich A. Hayek: A Centenary Appreciation

Hayek Was Right About Both Keynesianism and Socialism

MAY 01, 1999 by RICHARD EBELING

The New Money

Will New U.S. Currency Features Inhibit Counterfeiting?

MAY 01, 1999 by GEORGE C. LEEF

Gold Policy in the 1930s

How the Fed Monetarily Starved the Country into the Great Contraction

MAY 01, 1999 by RICHARD H. TIMBERLAKE

Tensions in Early American Political Thought

Liberalism and Republicanism Together Made for a Stronger Worldview

MAY 01, 1999 by JOSEPH R. STROMBERG

According to the eminent historian of political thought J.G.A. Pocock, republican theory (or "civic humanism") was the most significant current of eighteenth-century English and American political philosophy. In the form of "country ideology," republicanism gave "left" and "right" critics of government policies a framework and believable rhetoric for their arguments.

Hayek Turns 100

Hayek Contributed an Ocean of Knowledge to the Cause of Human Freedom

MAY 01, 1999 by DONALD BOUDREAUX
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April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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