Freeman

May 2000

Volume 50, 2000

FEATURES

The Dangers of Growing Up Comfortable

The Laws of Wealth Creation Are Not Learned Automatically

MAY 01, 2000 by STEVEN YATES

Trust and Privacy on the Net

Most Internet Issues Are Really About Confidentiality

MAY 01, 2000 by DANIEL KLEIN

The Internet and the Death of the Sales Tax

E-Commerce Allows Consumers to "Flee" to Low-Tax States

MAY 01, 2000 by DAVID LABAND, RICHARD W. AULT

Disaster Relief Then and Now

Early Americans Were Self-Reliant

MAY 01, 2000 by JANET SHARP HERMANN

Free Markets and Highest Valued Use

Knowledge Is Never Perfect

MAY 01, 2000 by ROY CORDATO

A Breach of the Public Trust

The Reinterpretation of Statutory Mandates Is a Dangerous Trend

MAY 01, 2000 by M. REED HOPPER

La Lucha: The Human Cost of Economic Repression in Cuba

Cubans Struggle to Make Ends Meet as They Wait for Change

MAY 01, 2000 by PATRICIA LINDERMAN

The Cuyahoga Revisited

What Caused the Cuyahoga River Fire of 1969?

MAY 01, 2000 by STACIE THOMAS

The Starship Private Enterprise

What Should Star Trek's Success and Space Exploration Have in Common?

MAY 01, 2000 by TIMOTHY SANDEFUR

The Common Good Demystified

Does the Common Good Require Coercive Redistribution?

MAY 01, 2000 by EDWARD YOUNKINS
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