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May 2003

Volume 53, 2003

FEATURES

A Philanthropist Goes to Washington

Ruth Lilly's $120 Million Donation to Americans for the Arts is Hardly Philanthropic

MAY 01, 2003 by JAMES L. PAYNE

The State's Quest for Total Information Awareness

Making it Easier for Strangers to Roam through Our Private Records Will Not Increase Our Security

MAY 01, 2003 by DAVID M. BROWN

Selling History with Dolls

Free Markets, Selling History, Can Benefit Us All

MAY 01, 2003 by ANDREW P. MORRISS

Does Prosperity Depend on Education?

Numerous Self-Made Tycoons Succeed with Limited Formal Education

MAY 01, 2003 by CHRISTOPHER LINGLE

How California's Consumer Laws Legalize Extortion

California Trial Lawyers Target Small Business with Frivolous Lawsuits

MAY 01, 2003 by STEVEN GREENHUT

I Never Dream of Nicotine

"Addiction" Cannot be Weighed, Measured, or Lovingly Caressed--But Trial Lawyers Can Profit From It

MAY 01, 2003 by TED ROBERTS

Saving the Environment for a Profit, Victorian-Style

Economic Progress Mandates the Development of Efficient Practices and the Discovery of Profitable Uses for Industrial Waste

MAY 01, 2003 by PIERRE DESROCHERS

What's Wrong with How We Teach Economics

Economic Education Places Too Much Stock in Mathematical Formulas and Not Enough in the Study of Human Behavior

MAY 01, 2003 by BRANDON CROCKER

Berry Gordy Jr. and the Original "Black Label"

Motown Records' Founder Gave America Some of its Best Music Moments

MAY 01, 2003 by LARRY SCHWEIKART

What's So Good About Democracy?

It Is Almost Impossible to Design a System That Produces "The People's" Verdict

MAY 01, 2003 by NORMAN BARRY

It was once said that "democracy is the most promiscuous word in the language; she is everybody's mistress." Indeed, political regimes of widely differing institutional features label themselves democracies, as did totalitarian communist orders. Often, the best guide to a country's democratic credentials was that it didn't call itself democratic: compare West Germany's Federal Republic with the East German Democratic Republic.

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April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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