Freeman

May 2005

Volume 55, 2005

FEATURES

Academic Socialism Versus the Free Market

Politically Funded Schools Teach Collectivism

MAY 01, 2005 by RICHARD EBELING

Academia has long been thought of as the marketplace of ideas, the arena where truth may be pursued through dispassionate discourse and openness to competing views. Yet higher education in America has moved a great distance from this ideal and its practice.

Economics for the Citizen

Economic Theory Cannot Make Value Judgments

MAY 01, 2005 by WALTER E. WILLIAMS

The Liberty Tradition Among Black Americans

How Black Americans Made Progress after the Civil War

MAY 01, 2005 by BURTON FOLSOM

College Suicide: Caveat Vendor

Whose Responsibility Is Suicide Prevention?

MAY 01, 2005 by THOMAS S. SZASZ

A Student's Essay That Changed the World

How Thomas Clarkson Emancipated Britain's Slaves

MAY 01, 2005 by LAWRENCE W. REED

Social Security Is in Good Shape?

Demographic Reality Says Otherwise

MAY 01, 2005 by MICHAEL D. TANNER

Creating Capitalists

Self-Generated Commitment and Work, Not Handouts, Build Character

MAY 01, 2005 by SHELDON RICHMAN

Inflation: Monetary and Educational

Education, Like Money, Is Overproduced

MAY 01, 2005 by GEORGE C. LEEF

A Lesson from the Plains

How Tipton, Kansas, Created an Elementary School

MAY 01, 2005 by MARK AHLSEEN

The Roots of Economic Understanding

When Should Economic Education Begin?

MAY 01, 2005 by F. A. HARPER
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