Freeman

November 1967

Volume 17, 1967

FEATURES

How Leaners Lose Their Freedom

NOVEMBER 01, 1967 by N. C. CHRISTENSEN

A visit to the local Welfare Office could tell us much about how freedom is lost, suggests newsman N. C. Christensen.

Whats Going On Here?

NOVEMBER 01, 1967 by RALPH BRADFORD

Or, visit the campuses, as Ralph Bradford has done, to know what is being dispensed there under the labels of economics and political science.

A Great Society

NOVEMBER 01, 1967 by EDWARD Y. BREESE

For contrast, retrace with Edward Breese, the origin and development of an earlier and strictly homemade great society off the shores of Massachusetts.

Inflation

NOVEMBER 01, 1965 by TOM ROSE

Taxation Theory

NOVEMBER 01, 1967 by W. M. CURTISS

Dr. W. M. Curtiss critically examines various theories of taxation and comments on current practices.

Because I Am an Individualist

NOVEMBER 01, 1967 by ANNE WORTHAM

Anne Wortham is an individual before she is a Negro, and respectfully requests that we let her keep it that way.

The Basic Realities

NOVEMBER 01, 1967 by LEONARD E. READ

And FEE's prolific author of "Deeper Than You Think," among other works, here delves into basic realities.

Discipline in Life

NOVEMBER 01, 1967

To the anonymous writer of the Monthly Letter of the Royal Bank of Canada, we are indebted for many helpful suggestions on the importance of self-discipline.

The Mixed Economy Mirage

NOVEMBER 01, 1967 by MELVIN BARGER

The much-touted "mixed economy" is no stopping place, thinks Melvin Barger, but merely a milepost on the downgrade into socialism.

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1967/11

NOVEMBER 01, 1967 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN

Though spun from the same wheel of Fortune, reviewer John Chamberlain now shares none of J. K. Galbraith's interpretation of "The New Industrial State."


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