Freeman

November 1969

Volume 19, 1969

FEATURES

Let Us Give Thanks

NOVEMBER 01, 1969 by DONNA THOMPSON

Thanksgiving and freedom go together.

The Golden Calf

NOVEMBER 01, 1969 by WALTER R. YOUNGQUIST

The sad story of how freedom may be traded for a false promise of security.

"She Says My House Is Dark... "

NOVEMBER 01, 1969 by BENJAMIN WOODSON

The immature, unaware of blindness, place the blame for their shortcomings outside themselves.

The Non-System

NOVEMBER 01, 1969 by MARTIN F. SCHAFFER

We can very well take care of ourselves if not over systematized by others.

Free Market Disciplines

NOVEMBER 01, 1969 by LEONARD E. READ

The market reflects the good and the bad in us, if we'll look, and also disciplines our expenditures.

The Battle in the Streets

NOVEMBER 01, 1969 by CLARENCE B. CARSON

"The rioters are following the lesson plan learned from the government."

The Value of Money

NOVEMBER 01, 1969 by HANS SENNHOLZ

Goods-induced and money-induced factors that affect the value of money.

The Mythology of Spaceship Earth

NOVEMBER 01, 1969 by GARY NORTH

How can man bridge the intellectual chasm between scientific knowledge and moral knowledge?

Unknown Costs of Pollution

NOVEMBER 01, 1969 by HOWARD CALLAWAY

Damages from pollution can be levied against those who cause the problem.

Good Sense Makes Good Business!

NOVEMBER 01, 1969 by HELEN BUGBEE

Preserving the climate for business is more important than selling a customer ideas about "rights" that no one can afford.

1  2 

Download File

EMAIL UPDATES

* indicates required
Sign me up for...

CURRENT ISSUE

July/August 2014

The United States' corporate tax burden is the highest in the world, but innovators will always find a way to duck away from Uncle Sam's reach. Doug Bandow explains how those with the means are renouncing their citizenship in increasing numbers, while J. Dayne Girard describes the innovative use of freeports to shield wealth from the myriad taxes and duties imposed on it as it moves around the world. Of course the politicians brand all of these people unpatriotic, hoping you won't think too hard about the difference between the usual crony-capitalist suspects and the global creative elite that have done so much to improve our lives. In a special tech section, Joseph Diedrich, Thomas Bogle, and Matthew McCaffrey look at various ways these innovators add value to our lives--even in ways they probably never expected.
Download Free PDF

PAST ISSUES

SUBSCRIBE

RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION