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November 1970

Volume 20, 1970

FEATURES

Harmony or Antagonism?

NOVEMBER 01, 1970 by FREDERIC BACON

In view of the natural harmony among men's interests, it is simply necessary not to try to redirect them.

Ends and Means

NOVEMBER 01, 1970 by WILLIAM W. BAYES

"Where there is a better choice available, no means which cannot itself qualify as an end should be used."

Rising Taxes Weaken the Dollar

NOVEMBER 01, 1970 by HANS SENNHOLZ

Federal deficits, however financed, are a drag upon the economy and a burden upon all citizens.

A Conservationist Looks at Freedom

NOVEMBER 01, 1970 by LEONARD E. READ

Because man is a part of his environment, he must rely on the market as his conservation guide.

"For the Best Interests of Man"

NOVEMBER 01, 1970 by A. NEIL MCLEOD

Conservation "movements" have many of the characteristics of war.

Dissent

NOVEMBER 01, 1970 by MERRYLE STANLEY RUKEYSER

Liberty tolerates dissent, but does not reward or excuse error.

Throttling the Railroads: 7. The Grip of Privileged Competitors

NOVEMBER 01, 1970 by CLARENCE B. CARSON

Subsidizing the competition, while strangling a business, spells trouble for all.

Fifty Years of Engineering

NOVEMBER 01, 1970 by BEN MOREELL

Emphasizing the special responsibility of the engineer for maintaining a climate of freedom.

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1970/11

NOVEMBER 01, 1970 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN


"The Art of Community" by Spencer T. MacCallum


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April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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