Freeman

November 1973

Volume 23, 1973

FEATURES

Our Disordered Lives

JULY 01, 1973 by EDMUND OPITZ

When a nation goes astray, the corrective is to be sought within the individual.

Political Corruption

NOVEMBER 01, 1973 by ALLAN BROWNFIELD

One result of all-powerful government and centralized power.

Health Care, Human Rights and Government Intervention

NOVEMBER 01, 1973 by GARVAN KUSKEY

A critical appraisal of the efforts to nationalize medical and dental services.

Let Education Go Commercial

NOVEMBER 01, 1973 by THOMAS L. JOHNSON

Exploring the market possibilities of resolving some of the problems of schools.

Welfare as a Right

NOVEMBER 01, 1973 by RIDGWAY K. FOLEY JR.

If it is a right, rather than a privilege, someone must be bound to deliver.

Dear America:

NOVEMBER 01, 1973 by HOWARD D. ALEY

An open letter from a young American.

How to Stop Inflation

NOVEMBER 01, 1973 by LEONARD E. READ

Take from government the power to create money and hand out special privileges.

The Right to Be Wrongand the Obligation to Be Right

NOVEMBER 01, 1973 by CHARLES R. LADOW

To the right of free speech is forever attached the obligation to be right.

Freedom/Responsibilitythe Quest for Individual Dignity

NOVEMBER 01, 1973 by ROBERT G. BEARCE

Only through self-improvement may one proceed toward a better world.

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1973/11

NOVEMBER 01, 1973 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN


"The Lady and the Tycoon: Letters Between Rose Wilder Lane and Jasper Crane" edited by Roger Lea MacBride

"The Political Illusion" by Jacques Ellul

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