Freeman

November 1974

Volume 24, 1974

FEATURES

The Blindness of Macro-economics

NOVEMBER 01, 1974 by CHARLES R. LADOW

A call to exchange the welfare state for the personal liberty guaranteed in the Constitution.

Who Owns the Job?

NOVEMBER 01, 1974 by CECIL GROVE

No one; the job is done as owners voluntarily exchange what is theirs.

Castles in the Air

NOVEMBER 01, 1974 by LEONARD E. READ

Progress comes as men put foundations under worthy dreams.

"It's for Real"

NOVEMBER 01, 1974 by WILLIAM H. PETERSON

How Los Angeles youngsters start in the lower grades to do business in a free society.

The Individual and Majority Rule

NOVEMBER 01, 1974 by RONALD F. COONEY

Concerning some of the abuses of majoritarianism against which Tocqueville warned.

Impossible Riddles

NOVEMBER 01, 1974 by BERNARD SIEGAN

The regulatory process invariably curtails development.

The Right to Feel Alienated

NOVEMBER 01, 1974 by ROBERT J. RUBANOWICE

If one does not feel alienated in the face of smothering collectives, he is lost.

British Booksellers Learn to Compete

NOVEMBER 01, 1974 by WILLIE E. NELMS

How a Nineteenth Century effort at retail price maintenance was broken to the advantage of the reading public.

The "New" Protectionism

NOVEMBER 01, 1974 by PAUL STEVENS

Statist interventions domestically lead to world trade wars; the antidote is freedom.

All Different

NOVEMBER 01, 1974 by GEORGE ELLIS

Afford every talent an equal chance to earn another.

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