Freeman

November 1996

Volume 46, 1996

FEATURES

SimEconomics

Some Computer Games Suggest a Society Can Be Planned

NOVEMBER 01, 1996 by LAWRENCE H. WHITE

Salvation Through the Internet?

The Internet Is Bumbling in Comparison with the Market

NOVEMBER 01, 1996 by DONALD BOUDREAUX

Home, Home on the Internet

How Do We Define and Protect Property in an Elusive Commodity Like Information?

NOVEMBER 01, 1996 by THOMAS BOUSTEAD

Liberty and the Domain of Self-Interest

Markets Channel Self-Interest to Serve All of Society

NOVEMBER 01, 1996 by STEVEN HORWITZ

The Social Function of Mr. Henry Ford

Our Ideal Should Be More Business Methods in Government

NOVEMBER 01, 1996 by SPENCER HEATH

Red-Lining the Federal Government Budget

Apologists Greatly Exaggerate the Public's Demand for Government Services

NOVEMBER 01, 1996 by RICHARD H. TIMBERLAKE

Law Enforcement by Deceit?: Entrapment and Due Process

Many Dubious Investigative Tactics Are Perfectly Acceptable Under Current Laws

NOVEMBER 01, 1996 by JENNIFER JOHNSON

Why Not Slavery?

Heavy Taxation Should Be Understood as Partial Slavery

NOVEMBER 01, 1996 by BERTEL SPARKS

Ending Tax Socialism

A Progressive Income Tax Violates the Heart and Soul of the Constitution

NOVEMBER 01, 1996 by JAMES A. DORN

For Appearance's Sake

Does Private Property Ownership Threaten Beautification?

NOVEMBER 01, 1996 by JAMES D. SALTZMAN
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