Freeman

November 1998

Volume 48, 1998

FEATURES

Nature's Entrepreneurs

Profit-Driven Entrepreneurial Approaches Can Protect and Produce Environmental Quality

NOVEMBER 01, 1998 by DON LEAL, TERRY L. ANDERSON

Regardless of Choice, Vote!

Does Responsible Citizenship Require Casting a Ballot?

NOVEMBER 01, 1998 by LEONARD E. READ

A New Monetary Universe

Market-Driven Money Would Put the Individual at the Center of a New Monetary Universe

NOVEMBER 01, 1998 by JAMES A. DORN

Does the Internet Prove the Need for Government Investment?

The Real Internet Grew out of a Spontaneous Ordering Process

NOVEMBER 01, 1998 by ANDREW P. MORRISS

Opening Pandora's Box

Politics Has Arrived at the Computer Industry's Door

NOVEMBER 01, 1998 by DAN FYLSTRA

The Mother of All Food Fights

We Don't Need the Government to Regulate Organic Food

NOVEMBER 01, 1998 by SAM KAZMAN

The IRS, Now and Forever?

Will Better Laws Fix a Notoriously Abusive Agency?

NOVEMBER 01, 1998 by JAMES BOVARD

Another Minimum-Wage Clash

Politicians Have Less Control over Labor Markets Than They Think

NOVEMBER 01, 1998 by RICHARD B. MCKENZIE

Do Corporations Have Social Responsibilities?

Free Enterprise Creates Unique Problem-Solving Opportunities

NOVEMBER 01, 1998 by JOHN HOOD

49 and Holding

Regulatory Burdens Prevent Businesses from Expanding

NOVEMBER 01, 1998 by RAYMOND J. KEATING
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