Freeman

November 2001

Volume 51, 2001

FEATURES

The Paradox of the Illiberal Cities

NOVEMBER 01, 2001 by ALEX MOSELEY

Urban populations typically vote for greater government control and hence more interference than rural populations do. The paradox is that city people are less restrained, yet they seek political interference in their own and others' lives.

Liberty, Property, and Crime

Public Property Enables Crime

NOVEMBER 01, 2001 by JAMES PERON

The Federally Mandated Toilet Still Doesn't Work

What Is the Government Doing in Our Bathrooms?

NOVEMBER 01, 2001 by MICHAEL HEBERLING

The Sustainable--and Young--Hydrocarbon Energy Age

Government Is the Real Threat to Energy Sustainability

NOVEMBER 01, 2001 by ROBERT L. BRADLEY JR.

Politicizing the Housewife

Choice Is the Key to Individualist Feminism

NOVEMBER 01, 2001 by WENDY MCELROY

Ten Years After the Bet: The More Things Change. . .

Population Growth Does Not Cause Poverty, Famine, and Resource Depletion When People Are Allowed to Be Creative

NOVEMBER 01, 2001 by MICHAEL D. MALLINGER

The Trouble with Teacher Training

Government-Prescribed Credentials Don't Create Good Teachers

NOVEMBER 01, 2001 by GEORGE C. LEEF

A Myth Shattered: Mises, Hayek, and the Industrial Revolution

How Did the Industrial Revolution Affect Living Standards?

NOVEMBER 01, 2001 by THOMAS E. WOODS JR.

Why Economies Grow

Economic Freedom Offers Hope to Countries Struggling with Poverty

NOVEMBER 01, 2001 by AARON SCHAVEY

Ethanolics Anonymous

Government Has No Business Rigging the Market for the Politically Well-Connected

NOVEMBER 01, 2001 by LAWRENCE W. REED

In June the Bush administration reported to Congress that the federal ethanol incentive program has done precisely the opposite of what was intended. Instead of reducing gasoline consumption, foreign oil dependency, and air pollution, the program caused Americans to use 473 million more gallons of gasoline in 2000 than in 1999. In fact, if this program remains in place, it actually will increase gasoline use by 9 billion gallons from 2005 to 2008.

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