Freeman

November 2004

Volume 54, 2004

FEATURES

Aaron Director on the Market for Goods and Ideas

Director Helped Change Thinking About Government Regulation and Antitrust Laws

NOVEMBER 01, 2004 by RICHARD EBELING

The More Things Change . . .

The Political Incentive to Perpetuate Economic Fallacies Is Potent

NOVEMBER 01, 2004 by SHELDON RICHMAN

Corporations Should Pay Higher Taxes?

Rattner's Argument Is Based on a False Premise

NOVEMBER 01, 2004 by ROY CORDATO

Remembering Henry Hazlitt

Hazlitt Both Reported on and Contributed to the Field of Economics

NOVEMBER 01, 2004 by BETTINA BIEN GREAVES

All Poorer After the War

Our Prosperity Is Bound Up with That of Our Neighbors

NOVEMBER 01, 2004 by HENRY HAZLITT

Henry Hazlitt and the Failure of Keynesian Economics

Hazlitt Helped to Overthrow the Original and Primitive Keynesian Thinking

NOVEMBER 01, 2004 by RICHARD EBELING

Private Enterprise Regained

Communism Failed in Plymouth Bay Colony, Too

NOVEMBER 01, 2004 by HENRY HAZLITT

The Broken Window

NOVEMBER 01, 2004

Economics in One Lesson: An Appreciation

Hazlitt Wrote in Prose So Clear That His Ideas Seem Obvious

NOVEMBER 01, 2004 by DAVID R. HENDERSON

The Legacy of Marx

Wage Differences Tend to Reflect Real Differences in Productivity

NOVEMBER 01, 2004 by HENRY HAZLITT
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