Freeman

October 1964

Volume 14, 1964

FEATURES

Production Versus Consumption

OCTOBER 01, 1964 by GEORGE REISMAN

The difference between the "productionist" and "consumptionist" schools of economic thought is clearly drawn.

Industrialitis

OCTOBER 01, 1964 by HENRY HAZLITT

Henry Hazlitt refers to the popular cure for backward nations as an illness he would call "industrialitis".

The Sad Little Story of Wink

OCTOBER 01, 1964 by ROBERT S. STROTHER

The story of Wink, Texas, perhaps tells as forcefully as any other the futility of trying to rehabilitate an area the natives want to abandon.

Liberty and Law

OCTOBER 01, 1964 by KENNETH W. SOLLITT

A minister explains the manner in which laws can help or hinder the cause of liberty.

The Flight From Reality: The Mind of the Reformer

OCTOBER 01, 1964 by CLARENCE B. CARSON

Clarence Carson opens a new series on "The Flight From Reality," dealing in this introductory chapter with the viewpoint of the reformer.

In Self Defense

OCTOBER 01, 1964 by PAUL L. POIROT

When men rely on violence in their relationships, the result is government power with a tendency to grow.

The American Way in Economics

OCTOBER 01, 1964 by EDMUND OPITZ

The free market economy will spring naturally from the proper spiritual and constitutional framework.

Business and Government

OCTOBER 01, 1964 by W. ALLEN WALLIS

In Socratic style, the President of the University of Rochester examines the relationship between business and government.

Lincoln on Power

OCTOBER 01, 1964 by DEAN RUSSELL

Dean Russell finds in one of Lincoln's earlier speeches a timely warning against the man with a lust for political power.

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1964/10

OCTOBER 01, 1964 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN

From recent books by Senators Proxmire and Humphrey, John Chamberlain gleans evidence of what Holmes Alexander meant by "The Equivocal Men."


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For centuries, hierarchical models dominated human organizations. Kings, warlords, and emperors could rally groups--but also oppress them. Non-hierarchical forms of organization, though, are increasingly defining our lives. It's no secret how this shift has benefited out social lives, including dating, and it's becoming more commonplace even in the corporate world. But it has also now come even to organizations bent on domination rather than human flourishing, as the Islamic State shows. If even destructive groups rely on this form of entrepreneurial organization, then hierarchy's time could truly be coming to an end.
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