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October 1969

Volume 19, 1969

FEATURES

The Libertarian Philosophy

OCTOBER 01, 1969 by BENJAMIN A. ROGGE

Dr. Rogge explains his points of departure from conservatives, modern liberals, and the New Left.

The Great Depression

OCTOBER 01, 1969 by HANS SENNHOLZ

A survey of four distinct phases of the "great depression," with reasons and understanding that may help to avert repetition.

Socialized Airwaves

OCTOBER 01, 1969 by JERRY EMANUELSON

How the principles of private property might help to resolve a knotty problem.

Gold's Dust

OCTOBER 01, 1969 by GARY NORTH

Gold may well collect dust when properly policing a nation's monetary policies.

Read's Law

OCTOBER 01, 1969 by LEONARD E. READ

"No politician can fly higher in office than he flew while getting there."

The Quiet Revolution

OCTOBER 01, 1969 by EDMUND OPITZ

"In quietness and in trust shall be your strength." (Isaiah 30:15)

In Doing "One's Own Thing"

OCTOBER 01, 1969 by HENRY EDWARD SIMONS

Radically creative, yes, but not radically destructive of traditional ways.

Problem or Opportunity?

OCTOBER 01, 1969 by CLARENCE B. CARSON

When the garbage business is monopolized by government, how do we know whether a given item is a waste or a resource?

The Anyones

OCTOBER 01, 1969 by AL SIEBERT

A poetic plea for constructive differences among men.

Problems the Free Market Can't Solve

OCTOBER 01, 1969 by PAUL L. POIROT

The organized demand of something for nothing is the kind of a problem for which there is no market solution.

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April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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