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October 1979

Volume 29, 1979

FEATURES

Two Ways of Life

OCTOBER 01, 1979 by ROBERT G. ANDERSON

Capitalism or socialism? The nature of property ownership makes the difference.

This is Mine

OCTOBER 01, 1979 by ROBERT LEFEVRE

How the concept of ownership might have emerged to undergird production and trade and civilization.

"The King is Dead"

OCTOBER 01, 1979 by LEONARD FRANCKOWIAK

Government licensing curbs capitalism and freedom.

The Hidden Fallacies Behind Intervention

OCTOBER 01, 1979 by CLARENCE B. CARSON

Man and the market economy are of a nature that cannot be improved or repaired by coercive measures.

Mass Transit Mess

OCTOBER 01, 1979 by JOHN SEMMENS

Let taxpayers beware of the claims that mass transit affords a solution to the "energy crisis."

Table Fable

OCTOBER 01, 1979 by RUSSELL SHANNON

How Tom Smith drew upon his resources to cope with competition in a changing market.

In Defense of Freedom: Frederic Bastiat

OCTOBER 01, 1979 by ROBERT G. BEARCE

In our current age of intervention and crisis, let us heed Bastiat's call: Try liberty.

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1979/10

OCTOBER 01, 1979 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN


"Forty Centuries of Wage and Price Controls: How NOT to Fight Inflation" by Robert L. Schuettinger and Eamonn F. Butler

"Inventory of the Private Papers of Ludwig von Mises" compiled by L. John Van Til


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April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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