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October 1998

Volume 48, 1998

FEATURES

The Nature and Significance of Economic Education

Economists Should Pursue Their Science with Objectivity, Detachment, and Passion

OCTOBER 01, 1998 by ISRAEL M. KIRZNER

On Behalf of the Ideal

Undoing Socialism Requires Upholding the Ideal of Freedom

OCTOBER 01, 1998 by LEONARD E. READ

Employers Swamped by Good Intentions

Employment Law Is Not a System for Preventing Disputes

OCTOBER 01, 1998 by JAMES L. PAYNE

Discrimination by the Numbers: Lies, Damned Lies, and Statistics

Statistics Alone Cannot Prove Discrimination

OCTOBER 01, 1998 by ROBERT A. LEVY

Terms of Impairment

The ADA Blurs the Line Between Lawful Activity and Unlawful Discrimination

OCTOBER 01, 1998 by GEORGE C. LEEF

The IMF's Dubious Purpose

IMF Activities Prolong Countries' Economic Problems

OCTOBER 01, 1998 by IAN VÁSQUEZ

Dr. Andrew Ure: Pioneer Free Trader

Ure Promoted International Free Trade and Unregulated Internal Industry

OCTOBER 01, 1998 by JOHN CHODES

Whose Kids Are They?

Compulsory Education Has Not Produced Universal Education

OCTOBER 01, 1998 by DAVID BOAZ

The Fine Art of Conservation

We Should Remove Our Ecological Resources from Governmental Stewardship

OCTOBER 01, 1998 by BERNIE JACKSON

Sizing Up Downsizing

The Market Economy Has Not Killed the American Dream

OCTOBER 01, 1998 by CHRISTOPHER LEE
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Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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