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October 1999

Volume 49, 1999

FEATURES

The Berry Bikes: A Lesson in Private Property

An Inexpensive Example of the Tragedy of the Commons

OCTOBER 01, 1999 by E. FRANK STEPHENSON, DANIEL L. ALBAN

The Encryption Scramble

Why Can't Americans Publish Data-Encryption Programs?

OCTOBER 01, 1999 by CLAUDE MORGAN

Bought and Sold: Drug Warriors and the Media

The Federal Government and the Media Form an Unholy Taxpayer-Financed Alliance

OCTOBER 01, 1999 by PAUL ARMENTANO

Wilhelm Röpke: A Centenary Appreciation

Röpke Was a Prophet Warning of the Dangers from a Loss of Our Moral Compass

OCTOBER 01, 1999 by RICHARD EBELING

Money and Gold in the 1920s and 1930s: An Austrian View

The Federal Reserve's Monetary Policy Was Consistently Inflationist

OCTOBER 01, 1999 by JOSEPH T. SALERNO

Market Money and Free Banking

Any Quantity of Money Is Adequate Because Prices Will Adjust

OCTOBER 01, 1999 by BETTINA BIEN GREAVES

Who's Locked In to What?

Government, Not the Market, Locks People into Bad Situations

OCTOBER 01, 1999 by DONALD BOUDREAUX

Health Care: Over the Canadian Cliff?

The United States Faces a Stark Choice Regarding Health Care

OCTOBER 01, 1999 by DOUG BANDOW

The Love of Economics

Economics Is Focused on Human Choice

OCTOBER 01, 1999 by SHELDON RICHMAN

Comparative Advantage

Free Trade Benefits High-Paid U.S. Workers

OCTOBER 01, 1999 by DWIGHT R. LEE
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April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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