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October 2002

Volume 52, 2002

FEATURES

The Peril to Our Privacy

Americans Are Losing the Freedom to Maintain Confidential Doctor-Patient Relationships

OCTOBER 01, 2002 by SUE A. BLEVINS

The Danger of National Identification

Where Will We Draw the Line in Violating Individual Rights?

OCTOBER 01, 2002 by DAVID M. BROWN

The Redistribution of Blame

Are Executives More Blameworthy Than Politicians?

OCTOBER 01, 2002 by HAROLD B. JONES JR., PAUL JONES

I, Government

Why Do I Inspire Such Wonder and Awe?

OCTOBER 01, 2002 by D.W. MACKENZIE

How Not to Combat Corporate Corruption

Coping with the Principal-Agent Problem

OCTOBER 01, 2002 by ANTHONY DE JASAY

Are Meat Eaters Starving the Poor?

Bad Policy Is the Real Source of Global Hunger

OCTOBER 01, 2002 by DENNIS AVERY

Airline Protectionism Hurts Travelers

Removing Protectionist Restrictions Should Substantially Improve Air Travel

OCTOBER 01, 2002 by PAUL A. CLEVELAND, JARED R. PRICE

Race, Inequality, and the Market

The Free Market Is Not the Source of Black Underachievement

OCTOBER 01, 2002 by THOMAS E. WOODS JR.

They Learned from the Workers

Polish Students Learned First-Hand Why Socialism Doesn't Work

OCTOBER 01, 2002 by STEPHEN BROWNE

Beware "New Urbanism"

Smart Growth Advocates Are Convinced That Their Ideas Are Morally Superior

OCTOBER 01, 2002 by C.C. KRAEMER
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April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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