Freeman

October 2002

Volume 52, 2002

FEATURES

The Peril to Our Privacy

Americans Are Losing the Freedom to Maintain Confidential Doctor-Patient Relationships

OCTOBER 01, 2002 by SUE A. BLEVINS

The Danger of National Identification

Where Will We Draw the Line in Violating Individual Rights?

OCTOBER 01, 2002 by DAVID M. BROWN

The Redistribution of Blame

Are Executives More Blameworthy Than Politicians?

OCTOBER 01, 2002 by HAROLD B. JONES JR., PAUL JONES

I, Government

Why Do I Inspire Such Wonder and Awe?

OCTOBER 01, 2002 by D.W. MACKENZIE

How Not to Combat Corporate Corruption

Coping with the Principal-Agent Problem

OCTOBER 01, 2002 by ANTHONY DE JASAY

Are Meat Eaters Starving the Poor?

Bad Policy Is the Real Source of Global Hunger

OCTOBER 01, 2002 by DENNIS AVERY

Airline Protectionism Hurts Travelers

Removing Protectionist Restrictions Should Substantially Improve Air Travel

OCTOBER 01, 2002 by PAUL A. CLEVELAND, JARED R. PRICE

Race, Inequality, and the Market

The Free Market Is Not the Source of Black Underachievement

OCTOBER 01, 2002 by THOMAS E. WOODS JR.

They Learned from the Workers

Polish Students Learned First-Hand Why Socialism Doesn't Work

OCTOBER 01, 2002 by STEPHEN BROWNE

Beware "New Urbanism"

Smart Growth Advocates Are Convinced That Their Ideas Are Morally Superior

OCTOBER 01, 2002 by C.C. KRAEMER
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