Freeman

September 1969

Volume 19, 1969

FEATURES

Value - the Soul of Economics

SEPTEMBER 01, 1969 by W. H. PITT

Why inject anti-economic frictions into such a smooth-running mechanism as the market?

Student Power and All That

SEPTEMBER 01, 1969 by BENJAMIN A. ROGGE

The Professor offers some ideas on who ought to be in charge on campus.

Freedom IS Responsibility

SEPTEMBER 01, 1969 by BERTEL SPARKS

Not the guaranteed life, but self-responsibility - that is freedom!

Two Concepts of Equality

SEPTEMBER 01, 1969 by EDMUND OPITZ

Men who desire an equality in matters of justice must be free to differ in other respects.

On Economic Rights

SEPTEMBER 01, 1969 by DAVID KELLEY

There's an important difference between the natural rights to one's own life and property and the spurious claims against others.

Education in America: 12. A Philosophy of Growth

SEPTEMBER 01, 1969 by GEORGE CHARLES ROCHE III

In conclusion, education for individuality turns out to be an individual rather than a collective responsibility.

Too Mad to Laugh!

SEPTEMBER 01, 1969 by D. ELTON TRUEBLOOD

Persons consumed by righteous indignation may do more harm than good for "the cause."

Tax Policy

SEPTEMBER 01, 1969 by HANS SENNHOLZ

A search for policies of taxation consistent with the ideal of a limited government and a free economy.

Beyond the Law

SEPTEMBER 01, 1969

"Coercion does not intrude upon the becoming of good men, which is a process entirely separate from the control and prevention of bad behavior."

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1969/9

SEPTEMBER 01, 1969 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN


"The Treaty Trap" by Laurence W. Beilenson

"Enemies of the Permanent Things" by Russell Kirk


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